Mannatech Science

Phyt-Aloe

Phyt•Aloe® capsules or powder
Dried fruit and vegetable supplement. Naturally gluten-free. Suitable for vegetarians.


    

Ingredients

OpenAloe vera (inner leaf gel powder)

Aloe vera (inner leaf gel powder)

Aloe vera inner leaf gel powder  is the powder obtained from the freeze-dried gel from the leaves of the aloe vera plant, Aloe barbadensis.

For centuries, the plant aloe vera has been used by cultures for its beneficial effects on human health (1). Today aloe vera gel continues to be used in supplements, foods, beverages, and cosmetics. Aloe leaves consist of two major parts, the outer leaf epidermis and the inner leaf gel, which are very different in their chemical composition and properties. Aloe gel is obtained from the inner portion of the leaves. Aloe gel is rich in nutrients and contains an abundant supply of glycoproteins and mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides. Monosaccharide constituents include glucose, mannose, galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, galactose, arabinose, fucose, glucosamine, fructose, rhamnose and xylose (2).

Much of the health benefits observed by the use of aloe vera gel may be attributed to its high molecular weight polysaccharides. Before a process was developed to stabilize aloe vera gel or extracts, fresh preparations were regarded as being required for any therapeutic efficacy (3). It has now been shown that careful drying of aloe vera gel can retain the polysaccharide content important for producing many of its health benefits (4).

 

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® capsules
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® powder
   •  AmbroStart® drink mix
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  Ambrotose® Complex capsules
   •  CardioBALANCE® capsules
   •  Catalyst™ caplets
   •  EM•PACT® sports drink
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Manna-C™ capsules
   •  MannaCLEANSE™ caplets
   •  NutriVerus™ powder
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
   •  PhytoBurst® Nutritional Chews
   •  PhytoMatrix® caplets
   •  PLUS™ caplets
   •  SPORT™ capsules
 

 

 

References

References

1.  The Merck Index. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck & Co., Inc., 1996.

2.  Duncan, C., Ramberg, J., and Sinnott, R. Striking differences in Aloe vera gel carbohydrate composition, molecular weight and particle size distributions following processing will not be addressed by dietary supplement GMPs. Poster Presentation at the 5th Annual Natural Supplements Conference, January 17-20, 2008, Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine, San Diego, California.

3.  Gjerstad G, Riner TD. Current status of aloe as a cure-all. Am J Pharm Sci Support Public Health 1968;140:58-64.

4.  Ni Y, Turner D, Yates KM, Tizard I. Isolation and characterization of structural components of Aloe vera L. leaf pulp. Int J Immunopharmacol. 2004;4:1745-55.

Last updated November 2013

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OpenArabinogalactan (from Larix spp. wood)

Arabinogalactan (from Larix spp. wood)

Arabinogalactans are a class of long, densely branched high-molecular weight polysaccharides extracted for commercial uses from the bark of the Eastern and Western Larch trees, Larix larcinia and Larix occidentalis. Their monosaccharide constituents include galactose, arabinose, glucose and mannose (1). Larch arabinogalactans are considered a good source of soluble dietary fiber. Arabinogalactans are common in many food plants, including corn, carrots, tomatoes, pears, wheat and red wine (2)

The amount of arabinogalactan absorbed through the intestine after an oral dose is unclear. Non-absorbed arabinogalactan is fermented by bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract (3),(4). Larch arabinogalactans are approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) (21CFR172.610).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® capsules
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® powder
   •  AmbroStart® drink mix
   •  Ambrotose® Complex capsules
   •  Ambrotose® Complex powder
   •  CardioBALANCE® capsules
   •  Catalyst™ caplets
   •  EM•PACT®
   •  Manna-C™ capsules
   •  MannaCLEANSE™ caplets
   •  NutriVerus™ powder
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
   •  PLUS™ caplets
   •  SPORT™ capsules
 

References

References

 

     1.    Luta G, Duncan C, Sinnott R. Chemical characterization of polysaccharide-rich ingredients from Aloe vera, Larix laricina and Larix occidentalis, and Undaria pinnatifida. Presented at the Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine's 6th Annual Natural Supplements Conference, San Diego, California.January 22-25, 2009. 2009.
     2.    Cui SW. Polysaccharide Gums from Agricultural Products: Processing, Structures & Functionality. Lancaster, Pa.: Technomic Publishing Co., Inc., 2001.
     3.    Crociani F, Alessandrini A, Mucci MM, Biavati B. Degradation of complex carbohydrates by Bifidobacterium spp. Int J Food Microbiol 1994;24:199-210.
     4.    Kelly GS. 'Larch arabinogalactan: clinical relevance of a novel immune-enhancing polysaccharide. Altern.Med Rev 1999;4:96-103.

Last updated March, 2013

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OpenBroccoli (flower/stalk)

Broccoli (flower/stalk)

Broccoli. The leaves and stem of broccoli, Brassica oleracea italica, are an excellent source of calcium, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A and vitamin C. Broccoli also contains the additional nutrients protein, fiber, iron, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid and biotin, as well as bioflavonoids (1). Many of these nutrients have antioxidant properties.
     Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are biologically inactive, sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the biologically active metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine (2). Broccoli has a high glucosinolate content compared to other cruciferous vegetables, and broccoli extracts have a particularly high concentration of sulforaphane (3), (4).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  NutriVerus™ powder    •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. Lund E. Non-nutritive bioactive constituents of plants: dietary sources and health benefits of glucosinolates. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2003;73:135-43.

3. Zhang Y, Talalay P, Cho CG, Posner GH. Proc Natl Acad Sci U.S A 1992;89:2399-403.

4. McNaughton SA, Marks GC. Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. Br J Nutr 2003;90:687-97.

Last updated June, 2012

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OpenBrussels sprout (aerial part)

Brussels sprout (aerial part)

Brussels sprout is a cruciferous vegetable closely related to the cabbage and a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. The sprouts are named for the area in which they were first cultivated sometime around the 15th century, Brussels, Belgium (1). Brussels sprouts are an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin K, and a good source of manganese. They are also a source of riboflavin, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, dietary fiber, protein, vitamin A, thiamin, vitamin B6, folate and potassium (2). Many of these nutrients have antioxidant activities.
     Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine (3). Brussels sprouts have a particularly high glucosinolate content compared to other cruciferous vegetables (4).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.
 
3. Lund E. Non-nutritive bioactive constituents of plants: dietary sources and health benefits of glucosinolates. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2003;73:135-43.
 
4. McNaughton SA, Marks GC. Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. Br J Nutr 2003;90:687-97.
 

Last updated March, 2009

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OpenCabbage (leaf)

Cabbage (leaf)

Cabbage is a cruciferous vegetable that is a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. Cabbage ranks fifth in the world as a vegetable crop. The U.S. is one of the leading cabbage-producing countries, where about 15% of the total crop is made into sauerkraut and the rest is marketed fresh (1). Cabbage is an excellent source of vitamin C and vitamin K, as well as a source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, folate and manganese (2).
     Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine (3). Cabbage has a high glucosinolate content when compared with other cruciferous vegetables (4).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

3. Lund E. Non-nutritive bioactive constituents of plants: dietary sources and health benefits of glucosinolates. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2003;73:135-43.

4. McNaughton SA, Marks GC. Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. Br J Nutr 2003;90:687-97.

Last updated March, 2009

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OpenCarrot (root)

Carrot (root)

Carrot. The edible roots of the carrot plant, Dacus carota, are one of the world’s leading vegetable crops. Carrots are a member of the parsley family, Apiaceae or Umbelliferae, and are one of the richest vegetable sources of vitamin A and beta-carotene (1). Carrots are also a good source of vitamin K and a source of vitamin C, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B6, folate, manganese, dietary fiber and potassium (2). Many of these nutrients have antioxidant activities.

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  NutriVerus™ powder
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

Last updated March, 2013

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OpenCauliflower (flower/stalk)

Cauliflower (flower/stalk)

Cauliflower is a cruciferous vegetable that is a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. The edible part of cauliflower is its large flower head, which is usually white but can also be colored light green or purple. Cauliflower is an excellent source of vitamin C and a good source of vitamin K, as well as a source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, folate, pantothenic acid, potassium and manganese (1).
     Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine (2). Cauliflower has a moderate glucosinolate content when compared with other cruciferous vegetables (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

2. Lund E. Non-nutritive bioactive constituents of plants: dietary sources and health benefits of glucosinolates. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2003;73:135-43.

3. McNaughton SA, Marks GC. Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. Br J Nutr 2003;90:687-97.

Last updated March, 2009

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OpenGarlic (bulb)

Garlic (bulb)

Garlic, a member of the onion family Alliaceae, is an herb that has been used as a medicinal agent and a seasoning for many centuries (1). Garlic is an excellent source of calcium, selenium, vitamin C, vitamin B6 and manganese and a good source of protein, copper and phosphorus (2). Many of the health benefits of garlic are attributed to its sulfur-containing compounds – thiosulfinates, sulfoxides and dithiins – which are also responsible for its distinctive odor (3). Garlic and its derivatives are considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use as food additives (21CFR184.1317) (4).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  CardioBALANCE® capsules
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

3. Natural Standard Database. www.naturalstandard.com. 2009.

4. Food and Drug Administration. EAFUS: A Food Additive Database. http://www.foodsafety.gov/~dms/eafus.html. 10-17-2008. 12-4-2008.

Last updated March, 2009

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OpenGhatti gum

Ghatti gum

 

Ghatti gum, a mixture of complex polysaccharides, comes from the bark of Anogeissus latifolia, a large tree native to India and Sri Lanka. Monosaccharide constituents include arabinose, galactose, mannose, xylose and glucuronic acid. Ghatti gum is used in supplements, foods, drugs and cosmetics. It contains as much as 80% soluble dietary fiber (1).
 
Most gums are believed to be largely degraded in the colon (2). Test tube studies have demonstrated the fermentation of ghatti gum by the beneficial human bacteria species Bifidobacterium (3),(4). Ghatti gum is considered generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is permitted for use as a food (21CFR184.1333).

 This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® capsules
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® powder
   •  AmbroStart® drink mix
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  Ambrotose® Complex capsules
   •  Ambrotose® Complex powder
   •  CardioBALANCE® capsules
   •  Catalyst™ caplets
   •  EM•PACT® sports drink
   •  Emprizone® gel
   •  FIRM with Ambrotose® cream
   •  Manna-C™ capsules
   •  MannaCLEANSE™ caplets
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
   •  PLUS™ caplets
   •  SPORT™ capsules
 

References

References

1. Glicksman M. Gum Ghatti (Indian gum). In: Glicksman M, ed. Food Hydrocolloids. Boca Raton: CRC Press 1983:31-7.

2. Hill MJ. Bacterial fermentation of complex carbohydrate in the human colon. Eur J Cancer Prev 1995;4:353-8.

3. Crociani F, Alessandrini A, Mucci MM, Biavati B. Degradation of complex carbohydrates by Bifidobacterium spp. Int J Food Microbiol 1994;24:199-210.

4. Salyers AA, West SE, Vercellotti JR, Wilkins TD. Fermentation of mucins and plant polysaccharides by anaerobic bacteria from the human colon. Appl Environ Microbiol 1977;34:529-33.

Last updated November 2013

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OpenGum tragacanth

Gum tragacanth

Gum tragacanth comes from the stems and branches of the flowering plant Astragalus gummifer. The raw gum is made up of a mixture of two polysaccharides. Monosaccharide constituents include galactose, arabinose, xylose, fucose, rhamnose, and galacturonic acid (1). Gum tragacanth has been approved for use in pharmaceuticals in the U.S. since 1820 and in foods since 1925 (2). Most gums are believed to be largely degraded in the colon (3). Test tube studies have demonstrated that gum tragacanth can be digested by a number of bacteria that inhabit the human colon, including the beneficial Bifidobacteria species (4),(5). Gum tragacanth is generally recognized as safe (GRAS) by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is commonly added to foods (21CFR184.1351).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® capsules
   •  Advanced Ambrotose® powder
   •  AmbroStart® drink mix
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  Ambrotose® Complex capsules
   •  Ambrotose® Complex powder
   •  CardioBALANCE® capsules
   •  Catalyst™ caplets
   •  EM•PACT® sports drink
   •  Emprizone® gel
   •  FIRM with Ambrotose® cream
   •  Manna-C™ capsules
   •  MannaCLEANSE™ caplets
   •  NutriVerus™ powder
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
   •  PLUS™ caplets
   •  SPORT™ capsules
 

References

References

1. Anderson DM, Howlett JF, McNab CG. The amino acid composition of the proteinaceous component of gum tragacanth (Asiatic Astragalus spp.). Food Addit Contam 1985;2:231-5.

2.  Anderson DM. Evidence for the safety of gum tragacanth (Asiatic Astragalus spp.) and modern criteria for the evaluation of food additives. Food Addit Contam 1989;6:1-12.

3.  Hill MJ. Bacterial fermentation of complex carbohydrate in the human colon. Eur J Cancer Prev 1995;4:353-8.

4.  Crociani F, Alessandrini A, Mucci MM, Biavati B. Degradation of complex carbohydrates by Bifidobacterium spp. Int J Food Microbiol 1994;24:199-210.

5.  Salyers AA, West SE, Vercellotti JR, Wilkins TD. Fermentation of mucins and plant polysaccharides by anaerobic bacteria from the human colon. Appl Environ Microbiol 1977;34:529-33.

Last updated November 2013

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OpenKale (leaf)

Kale (leaf)

Kale is a cruciferous vegetable that is a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. It is an excellent source of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin K and manganese, as well as a source of dietary fiber, thiamin, riboflavin, folate, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, vitamin B6, calcium, potassium and copper (1). Many of these nutrients have antioxidant activities.
     Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine (2). Kale has a moderate to high glucosinolate content when compared with other cruciferous vegetables (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  NutriVerus™ powder
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

2. Lund E. Non-nutritive bioactive constituents of plants: dietary sources and health benefits of glucosinolates. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2003;73:135-43.
 
3. McNaughton SA, Marks GC. Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. Br J Nutr 2003;90:687-97.

Last updated March, 2013

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OpenOnion (bulb)

Onion (bulb)

Onion. The underground bulb of the onion plant, Allium cepa, is the sixth leading vegetable crop in the world. It is thought that onion consumption dates as far back as prehistoric man (1). Onions are a source of vitamin C, vitamin B6, manganese, thiamin, folate, phosphorus and potassium (2). Many of the health benefits of onions are attributed to its sulfur-containing compounds, which are also responsible for the onion’s distinctive odor and its ability to bring tears to the eyes when cut. Onions are also a source of antioxidant flavonoids, such as quercetin (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.
 
3. Natural Standard Database. www.naturalstandard.com. 2009.

Last updated March, 2013

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OpenPapaya (fruit)

Papaya (fruit)

Papaya is the fruit of the papaya tree, Carica papaya, native to tropical Central America (1). Papayas are an excellent source of vitamins A and C, and a source of dietary fiber, vitamin E, vitamin K, folate and potassium (2). Many of these nutrients have antioxidant activities.

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

Last updated March, 2013

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OpenPineapple juice powder (fruit)

Pineapple juice powder (fruit)

Pineapple juice powder. Pineapple juice is extracted from the fresh fruit pineapple, Ananas comosus. The pineapple is native to South America and is now cultivated in tropical environments all over the world (1). Fresh pineapple is a source of bromelain, an enzyme that digests protein (2). It is also an excellent source of vitamin C and manganese, and a source of dietary fiber, thiamin, vitamin B6, folate, magnesium, potassium and copper (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

2. Natural Standard Database. www.naturalstandard.com. 2009.
 
3. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

Last updated March, 2009

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OpenTomato (fruit)

Tomato (fruit)

Tomato is the fruit of the plant, Lycopersicon esculentum, and a member of the Nightshade family, Solanceae. Cultivated tomatoes vary in size from cherry tomatoes, 12 cm in diameter, to beefsteak tomatoes, 10 cm or more in diameter. Tomatoes are an excellent source of vitamin A and well-known for their lycopene content, an important antioxidant nutrient (1). Ripe (red) tomatoes contain 3 to 4 times as much vitamin A as mature green tomatoes (2). Tomatoes are also a good source of vitamin K and a source of dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin B6, folate and manganese (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  NutriVerus™ powder
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Natural Standard Database. www.naturalstandard.com. 2009.

2. Ensminger AH, Ensminger ME, Konlande JE, Robson JRK. The Concise Encyclopedia of Foods and Nutrition. Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press, 1995.

3. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

Last updated March, 2013

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OpenTurnip (root)

Turnip (root)

Turnip is a root vegetable that is a member of the mustard family, Brassicaceae. Turnips are a good source of vitamin C and a source of dietary fiber, vitamin B6, folate, potassium, copper and manganese (1).
     Recent attention has been devoted to an additional component of cruciferous vegetables, namely, the glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are sulfur-containing compounds that can be broken down in the human gastrointestinal tract. Isothiocyanates, including sulforaphane, are the metabolites of glucosinolates that can then be absorbed through the intestine (2). Turnips have a moderate glucosinolate content when compared with other cruciferous vegetables (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose AO® capsules
   •  MannaBears™ supplement
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. United States Department of Agriculture. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 21. http://www.ars.usda.gov/main/site_main.htm?modecode=12-35-45-00. 2008.

2. Lund E. Non-nutritive bioactive constituents of plants: dietary sources and health benefits of glucosinolates. Int J Vitam.Nutr Res 2003;73:135-43.

3. McNaughton SA, Marks GC. Development of a food composition database for the estimation of dietary intakes of glucosinolates, the biologically active constituents of cruciferous vegetables. Br J Nutr 2003;90:687-97.

Last updated March, 2009

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Formulation Ingredients

OpenStearic acid

Stearic acid

Stearic acid is a naturally occurring fatty acid that is found in animal and vegetable fats. In dietary supplements, it is typically a combination of stearic and palmitic acids. Stearic acid is used as a lubricantin capsules and tablets and is also used widely in cosmetics and food products (1). It is used in topical formulations to assist in mixing ingredients and to stabilize oil-in-water mixtures (2).
     Stearic acid is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as generally recognized as safe (GRAS) (21CFR184.1090) and is generally regarded as a nontoxic and nonirritating material (1). It is also included in the U.S. FDA Inactive Ingredients Guide as safe to use in the amounts present in our products (3).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose® Complex capsules
   •  Catalyst™ caplets
   •  FIRM with Ambrotose® cream
   •  MannaCLEANSE™ caplets
   •  Mannatech LIFT™ Body Lotion
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
   •  PLUS™ caplets
 

References

References

1. Handbook of Pharmaceutical Excipients. Gurnee, IL: Pharmaceutical Press, 2006.

2. International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook. Washington, D.C.: The Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association, 2006.

3. FDA Inactive Ingredients Guide. http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/iig/index.cfm. 2007.

Last updated November 2013

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OpenVegetable cellulose

Vegetable cellulose

Vegetable cellulose. Cellulose is a natural compound found in the cell walls of many plants. Powdered cellulose is added to tablets and capsules for a variety of reasons: to dilute the ingredients in tablets or capsules or to help tablets disintegrate following ingestion. Powdered cellulose is not absorbed systemically following oral ingestion and thus has little potential for toxicity. While consumption of large amounts (i.e., 6 g) may have a laxative effect, this is not a concern for individuals consuming the small amounts used as formulation aids in dietary supplements (1).

This ingredient can be found in the following products:
   •  Ambrotose® Complex capsules
   •  BounceBack® capsules
   •  GI-ZYME® capsules
   •  Manna-C™ capsules
   •  Optimal Support Packets
   •  Phyt-Aloe® capsules or powder
 

References

References

1. Handbook of Pharmaceutical Excipients. Gurnee, IL: Pharmaceutical Press, 2006.

Last updated July, 2013

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* This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

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