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Ingredient:

Aloe barbadensis leaf juice extract (Manapol)

Aloe barbadensis leaf juice extract (Manapol)® is a polysaccharide found in aloe vera gel. For centuries, the plant aloe vera has been used by cultures for its beneficial effects on human health 1. Today aloe vera gel continues to be used in supplements, foods, beverages, and cosmetics. Aloe leaves consist of two major parts, the outer leaf epidermis and the inner leaf gel, which are very different in their chemical composition and properties. Aloe gel, obtained from the inner portion of the leaves, is rich in nutrients and contains an abundant supply of glycoproteins and mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides. Monosaccharide constituents include glucose, mannose, galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, galactose, arabinose, fucose, glucosamine, fructose, rhamnose and xylose

Aloe leaves consist of two major parts, the outer leaf epidermis and the inner leaf gel, which are very different in their chemical composition and properties. Aloe gel, obtained from the inner portion of the leaves, is rich in nutrients and contains an abundant supply of glycoproteins and mono-, oligo- and polysaccharides. Monosaccharide constituents include glucose, mannose, galacturonic acid, glucuronic acid, galactose, arabinose, fucose, glucosamine, fructose, rhamnose and xylose 2. Much of the health benefits observed by the use of aloe vera gel may be attributed to its high molecular weight (MW) polysaccharides. Before a process was developed to stabilize aloe vera gel or extracts, fresh preparations were regarded as being required for any therapeutic efficacy

Much of the health benefits observed by the use of aloe vera gel may be attributed to its high molecular weight (MW) polysaccharides. Before a process was developed to stabilize aloe vera gel or extracts, fresh preparations were regarded as being required for any therapeutic efficacy 3. It is now clear that careful drying of aloe vera gel can retain the polysaccharide content important for producing many of its health benefits 4. An ingredient exclusive to Mannatech, Manapol is obtained from fresh, washed and filtered gel by a specialized extraction method that yields insoluble fibers and stabilized, high MW soluble fibers rich in long-chain mannose sugars—beta-(1-4)-acetylated polymannans (acemannan)

An ingredient exclusive to Mannatech, Manapol is obtained from fresh, washed and filtered gel by a specialized extraction method that yields insoluble fibers and stabilized, high MW soluble fibers rich in long-chain mannose sugars—beta-(1-4)-acetylated polymannans (acemannan)5. Mannose is an important glyconutrient sugar that supports cell-to-cell communication6.

Aloe vera gel has a long history of use as a topical agent to soothe and hydrate the skin and enhance healing. Many attribute the benefits of topical and oral aloe vera gel to its acemannan content. 7. The acetylation (i.e., attachment of CHO groups) of acemannan appears to be crucial for solubility and its ability to induce fibroblast proliferation and stimulate fibroblasts to produce the dermal extracellular matrix protein collagen 7,8. Acemannan has also been shown to stimulate the production of growth factors involved in healing 9. The mechanism by which acemannan exerts these effects was recently shown to be via the AKT/mTOR signaling pathway 10. The MW of over 20% of Manapol is >800,000. Preliminary evidence suggests that superior immunologic benefits may be provided by higher MW aloe gel extracts that have a higher mannose content5,11. Aloe vera gel is also used in cosmetics and personal care products as a skin conditioning agent, which acts both to lubricate the skin surface and to increase water content of the top layers of the skin by drawing moisture from the surrounding air 12. According to the Cosmetic Ingredients Review (an independent committee established by the Personal Care Products Council, an industry trade association that thoroughly reviews and assesses the safety of ingredients used in cosmetics), Aloe barbadensis leaf extract is safe to use in the amounts present in our products 13.

This ingredient can be found in the following products in United States:

References

  1. The Merck Index. Whitehouse Station, NJ: Merck & Co., Inc., 1996.
  2. Duncan, C., Ramberg, J., and Sinnott, R. Striking differences in Aloe vera gel carbohydrate composition, molecular weight and particle size distributions following processing will not be addressed by dietary supplement GMPs. Poster Presentation at the 5th Annual Natural Supplements Conference, January 17-20, 2008, Scripps Center for Integrative Medicine, San Diego, California.
  3. Gjerstad G, Riner TD. Current status of aloe as a cure-all. Am J Pharm Sci Support Public Health 1968;140:58-64.
  4. Ni Y, Turner D, Yates KM, Tizard I. Isolation and characterization of structural components of Aloe vera L. leaf pulp. Int J Immunopharmacol. 2004;4:1745-55.
  5. Luta G, McAnalley B. Aloe vera: chemical composition and methods used to determine its presence in commercial products. GlycoScience & Nutrition 2005;6:1-12.
  6. Alton G, Hasilik M, Niehues R et al. Direct utilization of mannose for mammalian glycoprotein biosynthesis. Glycobiology 1998;8:285-95.
  7. Chokboribal J, Tachaboonyakiat W, Sangvanich P, Ruangpornvisuti V, Jettanacheawchankit S, Thunyakitpisal P. Deacetylation affects the physical properties and bioactivity of acemannan, an extracted polysaccharide from Aloe vera. Carbohydr Polym. 2015;20;133:556-66.
  8. Gowda DC, Neelisiddaiah B, Anjaneyalu YV. Structural studies of polysaccharides from Aloe Vera. Carbohydr Res 1979;72:201-5.
  9. Jettanacheawchankit S, Sasithanasate S, Sangvanich P, Banlunara W, Thunyakitpisal P. Acemannan stimulates gingival fibroblast proliferation; expressions of keratinocyte growth factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor, and type I collagen; and wound healing. J Pharmacol Sci 2009;109:525-31.
  10. Xing W, Guo W, Zou CH et al. Acemannan accelerates cell proliferation and skin wound healing through AKT/mTOR signaling pathway. J Dermatol Sci. 2015;79:101-9.
  11. Leung MY, Liu C, Zhu LF, Hui YZ, Yu B, Fung KP. Chemical and biological characterization of a polysaccharide biological response modifier from Aloe vera L. var. chinensis (Haw.) Berg. Glycobiology 2004;14:501-10.
  12. International Cosmetic Ingredient Dictionary and Handbook. Washington, D.C.: The Cosmetic, Toiletry and Fragrance Association, 2006.
  13. Cosmetic Ingredient Review. Cosmetic Ingredients Reference Table. http://www.cir-safety.org/staff_files/PublicationsListDec2009.pdf . 2009.